Recommended Interesting Articles

Art Demos

How to Paint Gardens in Pastel: Impressionist Landscape Art

Learn How to Paint Gardens in PastelPastels are great for creating Impressionistic landscape art, reminiscent of Monet’s garden pictures. If you’re a fan of the Impressionist style, which is characterized by an emphasis on visual strokes and light and shadow, and want to learn some of the pastel painting techniques for creating a beautiful garden scene, check out Learn to Paint Gardens in Pastel with Jackie Simmonds.
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Drawing

Drawing Basics: Measuring Facial Features

In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing, we explained how to draw dynamic heads. We present an excerpt from the article about measuring facial features.by Dan GhenoIn my “Portrait Painting” article in the February 1993 issue of American Artist, I explained several feature-measuring techniques for drawing people.
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Drawing

If Freud Were to Look at This | Watercolor Painting Inspiration

Editor’s Note: Today it’s a pleasure and delight to share with you Betsy Dillard Stroud’s latest guest blog post, in which she features a selection of artists from her new book, Watercolor Masters and Legends. See what she has to say about Virginia Cobb’s “titillating textures” and “inventive shapes,” what Freud might say about Cathy Woo’s abstract art, and more watercolor painting inspiration.
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Techniques and Tips

Paint Water and Sky with Jon R. Friedman

Low Tide, Sunrise (acrylic and oil, 30×96) One Clean Sweep:Before beginning Low Tide, Sunrise, I decided that the essence of the image should be an instantaneous, panoramic sweep. I wanted the painting to smack the viewer’s eye with an elemental immediacy, presenting a luminous triad of air, earth and water—and then releases the viewer to linger over details of tone and texture.
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Artist Profiles

Enhance Color Relationships with a Midtone Watercolor Painting

Judi Betts was paying attention when she watched Millard Sheets demonstrate one of his watercolor techniques on how to section off the surface and invent color chords—color relationships—to make an underpainting that provided texture, shape and value. This visual collage, topped with complementary midtones, added mystery and established rhythm, making the painting itself richer.
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